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Wildlife Rescue

Atlantic Street is NOT able to accept wildlife drop offs at this time.

Our friends at Gold Country Wildlife Rescue are ready to help with your wildlife rescue needs. We encourage you to call Gold Country prior to handling wildlife.  Often wildlife does not need to be rescued, and is removed from its habitat unnecessarily.

CONTACT INFORMATION FOR GOLD COUNTRY WILDLIFE RESCUE

GCWR Wildlife Intake Center:

Open Daily 8am – 5pm

11251 B Ave. | Auburn, CA 95603

Wildlife Emergency Phone: (530) 885-0862

Email: [email protected]

Website: Wildlife Emergencies – Gold Country Wildlife Rescue

Transporting a Rescued Wild Animal

Some tips from Gold Country Wildlife:

  • Stay safe, wear heavy duty gloves if possible. Don’t let the animal bite or claw you. Please do not put yourself or any other people or animals in danger.

  • Keep the animal in a secure container (cardboard box, pet carrier, have a heart trap) lined with paper towels or smooth fabric that won’t catch on claws.

  • Note the exact location of the rescued animal – this is important information returning the animal to the wild.

  • DO NOT offer food or water.

  • Keep the animal warm and the container away from drafts. If the animal is very young (eyes still closed, hairless, featherless) put the container on a heating pad set to LOW.

  • If the animal is older, set only half the container on the heating pad, to allow the animal to move away or closer to the heat source.

  • Resist the temptation to open container to check on it.

  • Stress kills, and humans are stressful to wild animals.

  • Transport the animal as quickly as possible to Gold Country.

Additional Wildlife Contacts:

Ferret on a table with blue in the background

Ask yourself the following questions before you rescue a wild animal

If you answer yes to the questions below, please transport the animal to Gold Country Wildlife.

  • Is there a serious injury apparent (unable to walk, run, climb or fly)?

  • Has the animal been caught by a cat or dog? You may not see a puncture wound, and we will examine closely for any injuries. Puncture wounds require antibiotics or the animal will die.

  • If no injury is apparent and it’s a baby, has the parent had an opportunity to reclaim its young? A wild baby’s best chance of survival is with its mother.

Transporting a Rescued Wild Animal

Some tips from Gold Country Wildlife:

  • Stay safe, wear heavy duty gloves if possible. Don’t let the animal bite or claw you. Please do not put yourself or any other people or animals in danger.

  • Keep the animal in a secure container (cardboard box, pet carrier, have a heart trap) lined with paper towels or smooth fabric that won’t catch on claws.

  • Note the exact location of the rescued animal – this is important information returning the animal to the wild.

  • DO NOT offer food or water.

  • Keep the animal warm and the container away from drafts. If the animal is very young (eyes still closed, hairless, featherless) put the container on a heating pad set to LOW.

  • If the animal is older, set only half the container on the heating pad, to allow the animal to move away or closer to the heat source.

  • Resist the temptation to open container to check on it.

  • Stress kills, and humans are stressful to wild animals.

  • Transport the animal as quickly as possible to Gold Country.